DerbyJs or Racer on Windows

You could argue this just isn’t meant to be … and you might be right.  Unfortunately for me, flailing around in my Ubuntu VM is just a slow way for me to develop.  I know that makes me a terrible person, but sometimes the tools you use every day belong to the dark side.

In any case, I set out to get DerbyJs and Racer working on my windows machine.

DerbyJs and Racer are created by pretty much the same group of people.  They are JavaScript frameworks that run on Node.Js and use Operational Transformation to synchronize data in real-time across clients.

The tweaks

The first smack in the face is Redis.  You’ll need to install the windows version of that here, but that’s not remotely the hard part.  The difficulty is when you try to do your npm install for the example repositories of DerbyJs or Racer  .  Then all hell breaks loose, and you run into the “we don’t support windows” contingent with npm install redis.

Turns out the lovely people at hiredis do support windows though.  So here’s the trick(s).  Install hiredis globally FIRST (npm install -g hiredis).  Then go into your global npm cache and copy everything from %appdata%\npm\node_modules\hiredis\build\Release one directory down to %appdata%\npm\node_modules\hiredis\build (because REASONS).

Now npm install type things will magically start working — if you’ve put %appdata%\npm\node_modules into your system environment variables as NODE_PATH.  NPM doesn’t do that on installation because… it’s fun to google?

System Node Environment Variable
How to set your npm cache path

 

Now after all this effort  (at least at the time of this writing)  nothing will work.  You’ve got a couple more tweaks to make.

For Racer

You need to go in and remove all the “release kind of like this one” stuff from your package.json. (See JSON below with red things to remove.)  This is because the current release of Racer will not work with the example code.  No idea why because the problem seems to be somewhere in the Operational Transformation code — which is fiddly stuff.

"dependencies": {
"coffeeify": "~0.6.0",
"express": "~3.4.8",
"handlebars": "^1.3.0",
"livedb-mongo": "~0.4.0",
"racer": "^0.6.0-alpha32",
"racer-browserchannel": "^0.3.0",
"racer-bundle": "~0.1.1",
"redis": "^2.4.2"
}

BTW, below is, I think, my favorite bit of code ever.  When running the “Pad” example of Racer, it is fired over and over by a dependency (called syntax-error) of browserfy:

module.exports = function (src, file) {
if (typeof src !== 'string') src = String(src);
try {
eval('throw "STOP"; (function () { ' + src + '})()');
return;
}
catch (err) {
if (err === 'STOP') return undefined;
if (err.constructor.name !== 'SyntaxError') throw err;
return errorInfo(src, file);
}
};

I’m sure there is a good reason for it, but I can’t fathom it myself.  I had to comment it out.

 Now for DerbyJs

There is some sort of issue with how it is creating the paths for your views.  To get it to work, there is a patch you’ll need to add to your package.json.

After the patch is installed, you’ll need to go into the index.js of each of the examples and add it before the require(‘derby’):

require('derby-patch');
var app = module.exports = require('derby').createApp('hello', __filename);

I think that should do it.  I was able to get things running fairly well after that.

One last thing, if you happen to be using Visual Studio, I can recommend the Node.Js Tools for Visual Studio with some confidence now.  During the beta stage they were pretty bad about crashing my IDE, but (except when running unit tests) I actually prefer them to WebStorm now .  I know… sacrilege.